See the beauty in everything.
Should’ve gone somewhere far while I still had a chance. Life at home is becoming too unbearable

I should have gone to a 4 year school instead of this

They introduce themselves as pro-life. And I say, ‘Oh, I’m so glad. You must be fighting for healthcare for the poor.’ And they look at me like I’m bonkers.
Sheila Walsh, a Catholic nun (via stfuprolifers)
allthingseurope:

Marseille, France (by paspog)

allthingseurope:

Marseille, France (by paspog)

palestinianliberator:

kanyewesticleandthepeasants:

travellerintime:

As a response to a line of serious attacks on muslim women lately, thousands of Swedish men and women wore a hijab to work today. The purpose of this was to support everyone’s right to dress however they want and practice whatever religion they want. I thought that was worth mentioning.

if anyone is going to reblog this and go off on a rant about how this is somehow appropriation and how hijab isnt for men or some white privilege bullshit or whatever - im going to cut off your nipples with a butter knife. this is what human unity is - this, people being considerate, standing up for something they have a limited understanding of, trying to understand it because its a basic human right and ya know…showing that men shouldnt be beating a woman up for dressing how she wants

so pls dont give any bullshit this is great im so glad people did this - thank you

Just to add to the above - it was organized BY Swedish Muslims WHO CALLED ON AND ASKED EVERYONE ELSE to wear the hijab in solidarity. The fact that they have chosen to do so is NOT something to be bashed, but is instead a very thoughtful, courageous, and commendable act of solidarity

In the United States, mothers are increasingly finding themselves stuck between a rock and a hard place.

On August 7, the New York Times ran an article called “The Opt Out Generation Wants Back In” - a follow-up to a 2003 story about highly accomplished, well-educated American women who left the workforce to stay at home with their children. Ten years later, the mothers are seeking work that befits their abilities but most are unable to find it, causing them to question their original decision.

The New York Times piece frames the mothers’ misgivings as a result of questionable planning and poor marriage partners, paying mere lip service to the tremendous change in the economy over the past ten years. Whether to work or stay at home is presented as an option that has to do with personal fulfillment and childrearing preferences, divorced from fiscal limitations.

But for nearly all women, from upper middle-class to poor, the “choice” of whether to work is not a choice, but an economic bargain struck out of fear and necessity. Since 2008, the costs of childbirth, childcare, health care, and education have soared, while wages have stagnated and full-time jobs have been supplanted by part-time, benefit-free contingency labour.

… The assumed divide between mothers who work inside and outside the home is presented as a war of priorities. But in an economy of high debt and sinking wages, nearly all mothers live on the edge. Choices made out of fear are not really choices. The illusion of choice is a way to blame mothers for an economic system rigged against them. There are no “mommy wars”, only money wars - and almost everyone is losing.

The starting-point of critical elaboration is the consciousness of what one really is, and is ‘knowing thyself’ as a product of the historical process to date which has deposited in you an infinity of traces, without leaving an inventory.
Antonio Gramsci (via jahanzebjz)
positive-press-daily:


A health worker tests a child’s blood for malaria at a free clinic in Mali. A new study has raised cautious optimism that an effective vaccine might finally become available. [Getty Images]

Maverick malaria vaccine achieves 100% protection using parasites from irradiated mosquitoes

A malaria vaccine has become the first to provide 100% protection against the disease, confounding critics and far surpassing any other experimental malaria vaccine tested. It will now be tested further in clinical trials in Africa.
The results are important because they demonstrate for the first time the concept that a malaria vaccine can provide a high level of protection, says Anthony Fauci, director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland, adding that the findings are cause for “cautious optimism”.
No effective malaria vaccine is available at present. The World Health Organization has set a target to develop a malaria vaccine with 80% efficacy by 2025, but until now, says Fauci, “we have not even gotten anywhere near that level of efficacy.”
Scientists had previously been sceptical of the vaccine because producing it required overcoming massive logistical hurdles. The vaccine — called PfSPZ because it is made from sporozoites (SPZ), a stage in the life cycle of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) — uses a weakened form of the whole parasite to invoke an immune response.
Read more.

positive-press-daily:

A health worker tests a child’s blood for malaria at a free clinic in Mali. A new study has raised cautious optimism that an effective vaccine might finally become available. [Getty Images]

Maverick malaria vaccine achieves 100% protection using parasites from irradiated mosquitoes

A malaria vaccine has become the first to provide 100% protection against the disease, confounding critics and far surpassing any other experimental malaria vaccine tested. It will now be tested further in clinical trials in Africa.

The results are important because they demonstrate for the first time the concept that a malaria vaccine can provide a high level of protection, says Anthony Fauci, director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland, adding that the findings are cause for “cautious optimism”.

No effective malaria vaccine is available at present. The World Health Organization has set a target to develop a malaria vaccine with 80% efficacy by 2025, but until now, says Fauci, “we have not even gotten anywhere near that level of efficacy.”

Scientists had previously been sceptical of the vaccine because producing it required overcoming massive logistical hurdles. The vaccine — called PfSPZ because it is made from sporozoites (SPZ), a stage in the life cycle of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) — uses a weakened form of the whole parasite to invoke an immune response.

Read more.